954.668.0203
South Florida Flight Training & Aerial Tours
954.668.0203
South Florida Flight Training & Aerial Tours

How to Get A Commercial Pilot License

A Commercial Pilot Certification allows you to fly an airplane for compensation or hire. 

Our Commercial part 61 training is composed of two courses. The single engine course consists of 10 hours of flight in a Piper Arrow. Students reach the 250 hours and take the single engine commercial flight test. Shortly after, students begin training multi-engine procedures in a multi-engine aircraft. Students reach the 250 hours and take the single engine commercial flight test. That is immediately followed by a Multi-Engine add on check ride.

 Eligibility

To be eligible for a commercial pilot certificate, a person must:

  • Be at least 18 years of age.
  • Hold at least a Private Pilot Certificate.
  • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.
  • Pass the required knowledge test on the aeronautical areas.
  • Pass the required practical test 

Aeronautical Experience

  • 250 hours of flight time as a pilot.
  • 100 hours Pilot in Command time.
  • 50 hours cross-country flight
  • 10 hours of instrument training using a view-limiting device including attitude instrument flying, partial panel skills, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, and intercepting and tracking navigational systems.
  • 10 hours of training in a Complex aircraft
  • One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure
  • One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure
  • 3 hours in a single-engine airplane with an authorized instructor in preparation for the practical test within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test.
  • One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, one of which is a straight-line distance of at least 250 nautical miles from the original departure point.